Feed aggregator

Preach the rage, a Confederate Party, and more UU blogging

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-08-15 15:02
Preach it

It has been a week full of bad news, and the Rev. Dr. Victoria Weinstein exhorts her clergy readers to “preach the front pages” this Sunday.

Preach the news. Preach the fire. Preach the rage, the sadness, the lamentation. Preach it fierce. Bring your rage, your solidarity, your authority to confront: to confront ourselves, to confront our God, to confront yourself, to confront our sick, sick society. Confront what is really happening. (Beauty Tips for Ministers, August 14)

Patrick Murfin says that when the news beats us up, it is “time to step up, not away.”

Hiding from it will not save you. It will make you, however unwittingly, an accomplice.

None of us have the power to stop these things. All of us have the power to move the world, if only a little, along that long promised arc that bends towards justice. We are called to crawl out from under the covers and unleash our love—muscular love—applied with plenty of elbow grease. Not platitudes but action. (Heretic, Rebel, a Thing to Flout, August 15)

Ferguson, and wherever you are

The killing of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and subsequent events drew the attention of many UU bloggers this week.

The Rev. Meg Riley is “struggling to discern how to be part of the solution instead of part of the problem.”

Where do you locate yourself in these stories? Who do you see as dangerous, and who is trustworthy? Where do you locate safety? What would safety look like for the people of Ferguson now, for instance? As a white person in the U.S., I am conditioned from birth to see whiteness as safety—white neighborhoods, white people, white authority figures. My lived experience, my conversations with people of color, and my study of history have shown me over and over that this is a wild and cruel perversion of the truth. (HuffPost Religion, August 14)

The Rev. Jake Morrill says, “it’s not just Ferguson.

As protests in Ferguson, Missouri, go on tonight, a lot of my white brothers and sisters are focused on how, in the short-term, to restore order. But the real question is how, in the long-term, to restore justice. (Quest for Meaning, August 13)

The Rev. David Breeden responds in verse.

The measured response of empire
is death—war against war;
attack against attack; violence
to violence. Murder. Revenge.
Death. The measured response of

empire is insanity. The peace of
empire is reloading the gun. It
is the realm of hungry ghosts,
shiny new helmets in the void. (Theopoetics, August 15)

Christine Slocum is uncomfortable with the way African American spirituals are often sung in UU churches.

How dare white people sing African-American spirituals while our police forces shoot black teenagers.
How dare white people sing African-American spirituals when African-Americans are killed on the presumption of criminality by citizens?
How dare white people sing African-American spirituals when African-American men are sent disproportionately to prison on drug charges, despite similar rates of drug use?
I could go on. My point is that the oppression of African Americans has never ended, and yet white people sing the songs. (This Too Will Pass, August 10)

Kim Hampton asks, “How the hell did y’all get this blind?

Did y’all think that Trayvon Martin was a one off? Did you not see the story about Jordan Davis? Renisha McBride? (East of Midnight, August 14)

The Rev. Theresa Novak laments,

Oh waste of loss
America we’ve failed
Storm clouds gather
Justice must rain down
Tears are not enough. (Sermons, Poetry, and Other Musings, August 14)

Depression and suicide

Anyone who is suicidal may receive immediate help by logging onto Suicide.org or by calling 1-800-SUICIDE. Suicide is preventable, and if you are feeling suicidal, you must get help.

Kimberley Debus responds to the deaths from suicide of the Rev. Jennifer Slade and Robin Williams from personal experience, having “lived that moment, when a decision is made.”

You may not know what to say exactly. But say something. And genuinely listen. (Notes from the Far Fringe, August 13)

Kari Kopnick cautions against the phrase “committed suicide.”

People die by suicide. It is a horrible tragedy. But lets not make it worse by saying that our beloved brother or sister committed something. Language matters, what we say makes a difference and the words we choose change the meaning of what we say. (Chalicespark, August 12)

The Rev. Meg Riley acknowledges that sometimes love is not enough.

As I have witnessed the conversations taking place in the wake of his suicide—about depression, about grief, about being bipolar and about loving people who have depression or are bipolar, what I have realized is this: We are all grappling with the edges of the power of love. We loved him, and yet he committed suicide. Our love—the real love of millions of people—did not save him. If so much love couldn’t save him, where is the hope for the rest of us poor schlubs? (HuffPost Religion, August 13)

The Rev. Tony Lorenzen puzzles about how personally he has taken Williams’s death.

It’s the depression, both his and mine, that makes his passing a powerful loss. . . . Robin Williams evokes this pain about the battle with depression, not because he’s the first or most well known to die from it, but because he was one I grew up with and he played roles that deeply affected me. (Sunflower Chalice, August 12)

Politics and culture

Doug Muder asserts, “Not a Tea Party, a Confederate Party.”

Here’s what my teachers should have told me: “Reconstruction was the second phase of the Civil War. It lasted until 1877, when the Confederates won.” I think that would have gotten my attention.

It wasn’t just that Confederates wanted to continue the war. They did continue it, and they ultimately prevailed. They weren’t crazy, they were just stubborn. (The Weekly Sift, August 11)

The Rev. Tom Schade says, “We should be re-thinking all of our big thoughts about the state of our political order.”

The police killing of Michael Brown, and the police repression of the community that has demanded accountability, should push people like us (who are more unfamiliar and misinformed about the conditions of life of African Americans than we think we are) into an extended campaign of learning, re-thinking, and teaching.

Learning, Re-Thinking, and Teaching are political acts of great significance and power. (The Lively Tradition, August 14)

Categories: UU News

UUs gather nationwide to protest police violence, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-08-15 14:44

Silent vigil held for Ferguson teen killed by police

Unitarian Universalist Church of Ogden, Utah, minister the Rev. Shelley Page and dozens of members from various Ogden-area congregations gathered in downtown Ogden this week to hold a silent vigil for Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager who was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Mo. “(We’re here) to stand in solidarity for people around the nation and the world with those who have fallen to police violence,” said Page. (Standard Examiner - 8.15.14)

Related stories include:

“Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Elkhart holds candlelight vigil for Ferguson” (The Elkhart Truth - 8.15.14)

“Jackson residents take part in vigil for Michael Brown, victims of police brutality in Ferguson, Missouri” (mlive - 8.14.14)

“Vigil planned in McHenry for killed Missouri teen” (Northwest Herald - 8.14.14)

New Jersey congregation helps fund preschool education

The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Somerset Hills, N.J., presented a substantial donation to the Interfaith Hospitality Network of Somerset County to help fund preschool education for children served by the network. Members of the church also serve as volunteers to the network, which provides emergency shelter, transitional housing, and support services to families throughout the county. (nj.com - 8.10.14)

More news from UUs and congregations

The Rev. Marilyn Sewell, minister emerita of First Unitarian Church in Portland, Ore., offers advice on how best to help someone you suspect may be depressed. The first thing? Don’t tell them to count their blessings. (OregonLive.com – 8.12.14)

Members of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Akron, Ohio, focus on three main aspects of social justice ministry to change lives in their community: teen outreach, immigration justice, and food justice. The church was a recent recipient of the Unitarian Universalist Association’s Bennett Award for Human Justice and Social Action. (Akron Beacon Journal – 8.8.14)

An ex-Westboro Baptist Church member has come forward to offer advice to those seeking to dismantle the Kansas-based sect known for spreading anti-gay propaganda and messages of hate. “Create a dialogue of love,” Zach Phelps-Roper said in his own “Ask Me Anything” interview on popular website Reddit. “If you truly want the church to dissolve, that is what you need to do. You need to sincerely show them love.” Phelps-Roper now attends a UU church. (New York Daily News – 8.10.14)

Categories: UU News

Up to Our Necks

UUA Top Stories - Thu, 2014-08-14 01:00
'This is a problem for our whole nation, not just for people of color. We are in this together. And riot gear, intimidation, and more brutality from police are not the way forward towards healing. They are, in fact, yet another giant step backwards,' reflects the Rev. Meg Riley, senior minister of the Church of the Larger Fellowship, on the police brutality in Ferguson, MO in The Huffington Post .
Categories: UU News

A kind of mirror

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-11 01:00
SPIRIT: I never considered myself a visual artist, but then, I never expected to have cancer.
Categories: UU News

31 UUs arrested at immigration protest at White House

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-11 01:00
NEWS: Unitarian Universalists made up largest contingent in interfaith action July 31.
Categories: UU News

Woo, paying for ministry, mature faith, and more

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-08-08 10:24
Mature faith

When Sarah MacLeod no longer needs her UU congregation as a stepping stone from theism, or as a safe, supportive place during a personal crisis, she asks, “Why church?”

Church, because supportive community is built over time, not just used when in need.

Church, because working through pain, anger, and disappointment in community deepens understanding. . . .

Church, because it reminds us that community is larger than any one person, idea, or belief. (Finding My Ground, August 5)

The Rev. Tom Schade believes that a consensus is emerging among UUs, including that “the ‘language of reverence’ is now our vocabulary.”

President Sinkford was roundly criticized for suggesting that we needed to break out of the straitjacket of humanist language, but then, we did. We’re all about “calls,” “faith,” “mission,” “prayer,” “spirit,” and “soul.” Admittedly, we are probably sloppy in our usage, but everyone kind of gets what each other is talking about, and goes along with it. (The Lively Tradition, August 1)

Woo, but not woo-woo

The Rev. Dr. David Breeden reclaims the practice of spirituality from superstitious “woo-woo.”

There’s nothing mysterious about the mystical. Spirituality is a feeling. We don’t have to buy what particular religions are selling to access these feelings. It’s all in our heads. (Quest for Meaning, August 7)

Rachel Camille values sacred space, and notices that Unitarian Universalist meeting spaces tend not to feel “special.”

We didn’t talk about anything different from what we talked about at the dinner table. It wasn’t super deep. It didn’t teach me anything epic and huge. I didn’t feel connected to anything bigger than myself, which is kind of insane considering that in UU, I’m connected to the entire interconnected web of existence. It felt like a book club. We went into a room and talked about some interesting things, and that was all. The end. (I Am UU, August 7)

Rebecca Hecking is not Pagan, but does mark the Wheel of the Year.

The simple act of marking the day, noting the change, acknowledging the passing of time in a tangible, physical way, helps to counteract the fast pace of our busy lives. As the seasons turn, as the wheel makes yet another round, we note the passing of time in our own lives. Children grow. Elders pass. We move from stage to stage on our own journey. Bringing this to conscious awareness heightens our appreciation for life and its gifts. (Breath and Water, August 1)

Paying for ministry

The Rev. Tom Schade puts concerns about clergy compensation into a broader context.

The big picture is that most of us need a broad social movement to redirect the wealth of this country downwards. That means raising the minimum wage, building up the infrastructure of the country, forgiving student debt, investing in education, increasing social security benefits, bailing out underwater homeowners, empowering old and new unions, returning the wealth stolen from African Americans. More people should have more money.

And in that context, UU ministers will probably have a better future than it now seems. (The Lively Tradition, August 2)

Katy Schmidt Carpman asks us to remember more than just clergy when we talk about paying for ministry.

And yet in many congregations, ministers have the best compensation package. I would love to see a fuller conversation of compensation and financial wellness for all who work in churches. Yes, as a religious educator, I’ve got an interest here. But it’s also about our music directors, administrative staff, sextons–whatever positions make up each congregation. (Remembering Attention, July 31)

Energy and despair

The Rev. James Ford sees the future in the “mix of energy and despair” in Long Beach’s diverse downtown neighborhood.

Walking around downtown Long Beach I realized this is the future.

Edgy. Dangerous.

Colorful.

Chaotic.

A mix of energy and despair, people succeeding and people crushed. And downtown everyone living cheek-by-jowl, the same block with high-end lofts, middle-income condos, and inexpensive apartments. In places trash in the street, and not far away, pocket public gardens. (Monkey Mind, August 2)

Asked to write about yet another tragic news story, the Rev. Lynn Unger shares a poem, encouraging us to “Wake up. Give thanks. Sing.”

What will you do
with the last good days?
Before the seas rise and the skies close in,
before the terrible bill
for all our thoughtless wanting
finally comes due? (Quest for Meaning, August 6)

Photos from the “Humans of New York” project inspire the Rev. Dr. Cynthia Landrum’s thoughts about why we need safety nets.

I’m fortunate—we have family and friends able and willing to help. I’m a minister in a denomination that has some funds for ministers in financial crisis, and knowing that is a piece of sanity, a certain knowledge that there’s a safety net there for me. I’m also insured, which means there’s a cap to the financial trouble that health problems can bring me.

Not everyone has these safety nets. Many people have only the knowledge of a family member’s open door. Some people don’t have even that. (The Lively Tradition, August 6)

Gracia Walker remembers a long-ago encounter, one of many that helped her find her way from fundamentalism to Unitarian Universalism, and encourages us to be the kind strangers other people need.

You never know what seeds you can plant, what a bit of kindness can do to widen the thinking of someone who may be trapped in a worldview that doesn’t meet their needs, or let them grow to their potential. We don’t always have to preach, it may just be the patience we show that can change hearts. (Loved for Who You Are, August 4)

Categories: UU News

Faith leaders, immigration activists arrested at White House, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Thu, 2014-08-07 14:34

Deportation protest ends in arrests in Washington, D.C.

More than 100 faith leaders and immigration activists were arrested last week in Washington, D.C., as part of a larger demonstration protesting the deportations of undocumented immigrants. Director of the Unitarian Universalist College of Social Justice the Rev. Kathleen McTigue led the civil disobedience action along with other interfaith leaders, calling on President Obama and Congress to halt the deportations of unaccompanied children escaping the violence of drug cartels in Central America. (Huffington Post - 7.31.14)

Related stories include:

“More than 100 religious, immigration activists arrested at White House” (Religion News Service - 7.31.14)

“White House protest ends in arrests; Congress balks on border funds” (Tucson Sentinel - 8.1.14)

“Religious leaders arrested outside White House during immigration rally” (NBC 4 - 7.31.14)

“More than 100 faith leaders and immigrant rights activists arrested in Washington, D.C.” (Telesur - 7.31.14)

Local church groups support unaccompanied children

A group of 70 church-organized supporters, including the Rev. Robert Murphy of First Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Falmouth, Mass., gathered at a Cape Cod rotary to show support of Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s plan to use Camp Edwards on the Joint Base Cape Cod as a shelter for unaccompanied immigrant children. (Cape Cod Times - 8.3.14)

Related stories include:

“Austin, TX, wants to help illegal aliens” (Austin American-Statesmen - 8.7.14)

More news from UU congregations

LGBT activist the Rev. Mark Kiyimba of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Kampala, Uganda, visited the UU Church of Pensacola, Fla., earlier this week to speak out about the harsh anti-gay policies in his native country. (Pensacola News Journal - 8.3.14)

Hundreds gathered in Cincinnati to show support for marriage equality, marking the opening arguments for Michigan and other Midwest states in the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals. The Rev. Mary Moore of Miami Valley Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Dayton, Ohio, was present along with members of the congregation. “We believe in the inherent worth and dignity of everyone,” said Rev. Moore, “It’s not fair because I perform services for same-gender couples but they don’t get the same rights as heterosexual couples.” (Detroit News - 8.5.14)

Categories: UU News

UUA sells last Beacon Hill building for $11.5 million

UU World - Wed, 2014-08-06 01:00
NEWS: 41 Mt. Vernon St., former Beacon Press headquarters, will become condominiums.
Categories: UU News
Syndicate content