UU News

Seminary 3.0

UU World - Mon, 2014-07-28 01:00
IDEAS: Meadville Lombard has transformed its approach to theological education.
Categories: UU News

Detroit’s water crisis, worshippers harassed in New Orleans, and more

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-07-25 14:34
Water, water everywhere

The Rev. Dr. Cynthia Landrum writes about the water crisis in Detroit.

If you scratch below the surface of the call for individual responsibility in this case, it’s easy to see a level of demonization below it, and that demonization has some ugly, racist roots. This water issue isn’t really about self-reliance, it’s about “othering” the people of Detroit, about race, and about class. It’s about making the most basic human need into us-vs.-them. (The Lively Tradition, July 23)

Circle round for freedom

This past Sunday, anti-abortion protesters disrupted the worship service at First UU Church of New Orleans; the Rev. Deanna Vandiver, who was preaching that morning, shares a first-hand perspective on the congregation’s response.

Beloveds, I have never been prouder of my faith community. The youth led the way in circling the congregation together, forming a ring around the sanctuary and singing sustaining songs. Soon it became clear who was choosing to be beloved community and who was trying to destroy it. (Quest for Meaning, July 22)

Bart Frost, the congregation’s DRE, tells how he experienced the incident—and how he calmed his nerves afterward.

I spent the rest of the afternoon as I normally spend my Sunday afternoons, listening to music, writing and reading. The music leaned a little more towards punk sometimes, and Unitarian Universalist hymns at others. I reminded myself that there is good in this world, as I savored the sweetness of ice cream, good that is more powerful than hate and bitterness. (Vive Le Flame, July 22)

The Rev. Krista Taves suggests that other UU congregations can learn from this, and be prepared.

Most of our churches will never face this kind of sacred violation, thank the spirit, but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen. In fact, given the increasing legal challenges to reproductive justice, and the fact that many Unitarian Universalist leaders are publicly active in the women’s reproductive justice movement, we need to be ready. (And the stones shall cry, July 22)

For the Rev. Marie DeYoung, calling this “religious terrorism” is inflammatory language.

There is no question that the behavior of Operation Save America was outrageous, disrespectful, and a harassing form of public speech.

But, while their behavior as described most certainly was disruptive, it clearly was NOT terroristic. We should not inflate the meaning of fundamentalist intruders’ pesky drama to a level that only improves their odds of achieving media celebrity. (About Our Inherent Worth, July 24)

In memoriam

The Rev. Scott Wells remembers a colleague, the Rev. Jennifer Slade, who died last week of an apparent suicide.

I want to express my sympathy to her family, and to her congregations. I am praying for you and her, and for others—including a number of ministers—shaken and feeling vulnerable by her death. (Boy in the Bands, July 19)

For the Rev. Dr. Victoria Weinstein, this tragedy renews her commitment to reach out for help, and to ask her colleagues “Are you OK?”

The work of religious leadership is especially demanding in this time of closing churches and anxious laity. . . . We are “making it up as we go along” in a way that previous generations of ministers may be able to relate to culturally or theologically or organizationally, but not institutionally to this extent. The pressure is fierce. This is to say nothing of other life stresses of health, finance, family, community. (Beauty Tips for Ministers, July 18)

Lessons written in stone

Faced with a vocational setback, Claire Curole gets reacquainted with her rock collection, and relearns needed lessons.

I am being slowly reminded of things I used to know—the complex relationship between purity and perfection and beauty and fragility, how the things which are most interesting are not always the strongest or most flawless—and how those which are strong or flawless are not always the most interesting or beautiful. If I can learn from these stones the admiration of complexity, of fragility, of quirky individuality then perhaps I will eventually learn to apply these lessons more broadly.

The other thing of which I have been reminded is that, given enough time and the proper conditions, even shattered stones can mend, become whole—not that which they were, not exactly, but something more, something different. (The Sand Hill Diary, July 21)

Tim Atkins remembers a similar lesson about imperfection—from his days as a geology student.

One of the early lessons I learned in my first geology course? How minerals get their color. The answer surprised me then, and it gives me hope today. It’s the flaws—the impurities.

Impurities are what make rubies red. Flaws are what make emeralds green. And flaws are what make each of us beautiful, too. (Loved for Who You Are, July 21)

Faith and belief

For Andrew Hidas, skepticism began in childhood.

Believing in a heaven where my mother was denied entrance required suspension of every shred of rationality and native reason my mere 8-year-old brain was already manifesting. I would have had to take it “on faith,” but that was so absurd and impossible given the reality of my actual mom and her actual great big heart that faith didn’t stand a chance.

Notably, anything that has required similar “faith” on my part hasn’t fared too well since. (Traversing, July 21)

The Rev. Dr. Carl Gregg answers the question, “Why Unitarianism?”

Although there are certainly many other vital religious traditions in our world, at least for me, Unitarian Universalism is the path that I have found the most helpful for navigating a 21st-century world in which we humans have been radically de-centered from the exalted position some of our ancestors believed that we held. (Pragmatism, Progressivism, Pluralism, July 24)

The Rev. Dr. David Breeden considers falling church attendance.

People today are looking for connection and service. They want to gather together and heal our broken world. The don’t want the same ‘ol same ‘ol.

The building is burning. Even those who remain Christian are fleeing. And those who wish to explore other paths?

Well, I can send you the address of my church . . . (Quest for Meaning, July 24)

Categories: UU News

Anti-abortion activists invade UU worship, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-07-25 11:48

Right-wing activists disrupt moment of silence in New Orleans UU church

A national anti-abortion group interrupted Sunday worship at First Unitarian Universalist Church of New Orleans, La., during a moment of silence for a recently deceased member to advocate their pro-life stance. The Rev. Deanna Vandiver, guest speaker at the Sunday service, encourages the community to stand on the side of love. (Think Progress - 7.23.14)

Related stories include:

“Anti-abortion fanatics invade a church service. Where’s the outrage?” (LA Times - 7.23.14)

“Anti-abortion group harasses Unitarian church during moment of silence for dead member” (Raw Story - 7.23.14)

“Benham group disrupts ‘Synagogue of Satan’ Unitarian Universalist worship services, receives proclamation from mayor” (Right Wing Watch - 7.4.14)

UUA, other faith communities urge Congress to halt deportations

The Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) and other national religious organizations are expressing concern for unaccompanied children on the U.S.-Mexico border. Opposition to proposals for expedited deportation of migrant families was expressed in a letter to Congress to address what some are calling a growing moral crisis. (New York Times - 7.23.14)

Supporters call for unity in welcoming unaccompanied minors and refugees

A Massachusetts community has come out in support of unaccompanied minors after city officials voiced concern over overwhelming numbers of refugees in the local school system. The Rev. Victoria Weinstein of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lynn stood on the City Hall steps in support of the city and her neighbors who speak many languages. (ItemLive.com - 7.23.14)

More news from UU congregations

First Church in Jamaica Plain, Mass., is taking steps to fully divest itself of stock holdings in fossil fuel companies. Last month the Board of Trustees unanimously passed a resolution to immediately remove all investments in fossil fuels and prohibit the purchase of any new fossil fuel stock. (Jamaica Plain Gazette - 7.18.14)

A social justice project of the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Indiana, Pa., is helping to fight hunger by taking part in a county-wide program to meet the needs of elementary school children at risk. (Indiana Gazette - 7.7.14)

UU youth from congregations in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma came together for the second annual local service project at UBarU camp and conference center near Kerrville, Tex. This year’s project had youth working with the organization Southwest Llama Rescue. (news-journal.com - 7.1.14)

Categories: UU News

Evolution Camp celebrates science, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Mon, 2014-07-21 09:39

Evolution Camp offers summer programming unique in area

First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church of Springfield, Mo., sponsored an Evolution Camp organized by religious education director Jennifer Lara, who created the program from others used in UU churches. Parents throughout the area took advantage of the opportunity the camp offered to kids who love science and filled the roster in just a few days. (Springfield News-Leader - 7.11.14)

Other evolution camp stories:

“Vacation Evolution School? This Unitarian Universalist Camp May Shock You” (Charisma News - 7.14.14)

“Ken Ham Criticizes Unitarian Church’s ‘Evolution Camp’ for Children; ‘Shocked’ at Assemblies of God Presence” (The Christian Post - 7.14.14)

Read more about UU summer camps for children: “The only place I can really be” (UU World – Summer 2013) 

UU retreats and conference centers highlighted

The Unitarian Universalist conference center Star Island, located off the New Hampshire coast, is installing enough solar panels to power nearly 30 homes. They hope to be a model for the future of sustainable energy use on the mainland. (New Hampshire Public Radio - 7.14.14)

Members of GAYLA, a program of the Ferry Beach Park Association’s Retreat and Conference Center in Saco, Maine, reflect on how the organization has spent years offering a safe space for gay men to relax and rejuvenate themselves once a year. The Association has a proud historic connection to Unitarian Universalism. (Sun Monthly - 7.13.14)

More news from UU congregations

A group of more than 300 members of All Souls Unitarian Church in Washington, D.C., gathered in front of the Supreme Court steps to call attention to the need to strengthen voter protections nationwide. The flash mob event included a musical medley of justice songs. (HRC Blog - 7.11.14)

Volunteers from the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Silver City, N.Mex., have joined other local churches to support the children involved in the humanitarian crisis at the U.S. border with Mexico. The group is taking donations of a variety of goods, including food and clothes, to help care for the immigrants on a short-term basis. (Silver City Sun-News - 7.15.14)

The Unitarian Universalist Church in Chattanooga, Tenn., was named an early adopter in the community of environmentally sustainable initiatives. The congregation has installed solar panels, which enable them to sell the electricity they do not use to the Tennessee Valley Authority and supplement their income. (timesfreepress.com - 7.13.14)

Work begins this month on renovations at First Parish Unitarian Universalist in Arlington, Mass., to expand its buildings to accommodate the growing number of members and non-members using the space. Congregation members raised $2 million for the upgrades. (The Arlington Advocate - 7.14.14)

 

Categories: UU News

Preparing for a hike

UU World - Mon, 2014-07-21 01:00
SPIRIT: Imagine your way through the good route / and also the other route.
Categories: UU News

Meet our readers

UU World - Mon, 2014-07-21 01:00
NEWS: UU World's readership survey also offers an updated profile of the UUA's membership.
Categories: UU News

Singing our faith, post-theism, creating new worlds, and more

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-07-18 14:17
Singing our faith

The Reeb Project flash-mob video made by All Souls Church in Washington, D.C., found its way to Upworthy this week. Enjoy the singing!

‘Infidelity’ and post-theism

The Rev. James Ford marks Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Divinity School address as the moment when “the ‘new infidelity’ was brought home to the institution of Unitarianism.”

While Unitarianism had rejected the trinity and focused salvation on “character,” on the actions of the individual in her or his life rather than through a vicarious atonement achieved by Jesus’ death, it was nonetheless deeply rooted in biblical Christianity. . . . Emerson . . . explicitly [rejected] the necessity of scripture as divine revelation. Instead he declared that the intuition of the individual was sufficient to find one’s way.

This created a firestorm within Unitarianism. A fire that has not yet burned itself out. (Monkey Mind, July 15)

The Rev. Dr. David Breeden explains why he is a “post-theist.”

I bought a new Ford truck, not a Model T. Why? Because a Model T, even though it revolutionized the automobile industry, is no longer an efficient mode of transportation in the contemporary world. . . .

This is how I view “god.” It’s not that I don’t believe in the god concept. It’s that I don’t think the concept is good transportation in our contemporary context. (Quest for Meaning, July 17)

Love, love, love

The Rev. Amy Shaw suggests that the word “because” should not follow the words “I love you.”

Loving you because implies that there is an alternate world in which I could not love you, because. Or a world in which my love for you would change as you drew nearer to some select goal that you and I shared. (Loved for Who You Are, July 14)

The Rev. Amy Zucker Morgenstern objects to the word “bromance.”

In our culture, we don’t need a special name to describe the relationship between two women who love each other, love to spend time together, and are not romantically involved together nor seeking to be. We already have a term: friendship. What disturbs me about the embrace of the “bromance” term is the shunning of the obvious, available word.

Is there something so extraordinary about a close, loving, non-romantic relationship between men that we need a cute, arch term for it? (Sermons in Stones, July 14)

Liz James writes about loving beyond the bounds of committed relationships.

in the complete stretch of history i can see how
every time i felt this pull
to join with someone
it was because there was some part of them that i needed
to learn by heart (Rebel with a Label Maker, July 16)

Wholly interdependent

The Rev. Dr. Cynthia Landrum criticizes religious language about “brokenness.”

One of the most radical things we can do in the face of oppression is to counter messages of brokenness with proclamations of wholeness: I am whole; I am loved; I am worthy; I have inherent worth and dignity; You are whole; You are loved: You are worthy; You have inherent worth and dignity. You are loved — just as you are.

This doesn’t mean that we are perfect. It doesn’t mean that we never do harm. But we are still loved. We are whole, just as we are. (Loved for Who You Are, July 16)

Katy Schmidt Carpman writes that babies remind us our own interdependence. (Remembering Attention, July 14)

Creating new worlds

The Rev. Scott Wells notices that there was only one new congregation welcomed at this year’s UUA General Assembly, and wishes there were more.

To keep from shrinking, we need new congregations, and one isn’t enough. We need leaders with experience to foster new congregations, and one isn’t enough to found them.

So, again, I’m happy for Original Blessing. I only wish it had some cradle mates. (Boy in the Bands, July 15)

The Rev. Elizabeth Curtiss says it’s not too late for the UUA to move to Detroit. “Detroit has replaced Silicon Valley as the place where pioneers will create the real 21st century. Religion is about creating new worlds out of old chaos: let’s pull up our stakes and get busy.” (Politywonk, July 14)

Categories: UU News

Book group brings Muslim and UU women together

UU World - Mon, 2014-07-14 01:00
NEWS: Women from Unitarian Universalist and Muslim congregations in Silver Spring, Md., meet each month.
Categories: UU News

Remembering Pete

UU World - Mon, 2014-07-14 01:00
SPIRIT: To be honest, I still want to grow up to be like Pete Seeger.
Categories: UU News

Religious opposition to religious exemptions, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-07-11 14:21

Hobby Lobby opinion is not the opinion of all religious people

The Rev. Emmy Lou Belcher, retired minister of DuPage Unitarian Universalist Church in Naperville, Ill., joined clergy and others for a protest outside a local Hobby Lobby store. The effort, which included handing out condoms, was intended to show that not all religious people support the U.S. Supreme Court’s position in the recent Hobby Lobby case. (Daily Herald - 7.3.14)

Other Hobby Lobby protest stories include:

“Activists Hand Out Condoms at Hobby Lobby to Protest Supreme Court Decision—Their Profession Though Might Surprise You” (The Blaze - 7.4.14)

“Even Clergy Are Against the Hobby Lobby Decision—And They’re Protesting in an Unexpected Way” (News.Mic.com - 7.4.14)

“Culture War Notes From All Over” (The American Conservative - 7.4.14)

“Small protest held outside Naperville Hobby Lobby over Supreme Court decision” (Naperville Sun - 7.2.14)

The Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) joined over 100 other faith leaders and groups in signing a letter urging President Obama to oppose religious exemptions as he considers anti-discrimination policies in federal contracts. (Religion News Service - 7.8.14)

News from UU congregations

Unity Temple in Oak Park, Ill., named a UUA Breakthrough Congregation in 2008, shares how giving away the money they collect each Sunday has increased their pledge drive by 14 percent. One member said the practice has shifted the congregation’s way of thinking from one of poverty to abundance. (OakPark.com - 7.8.14)

When the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Somerset Hills in Somerville, N.J., moved into their new building, they purposely delayed dedicating it until renovations were completed that made it welcoming and accessible to all people. Each Sunday, they light a candle and acknowledge the progress they have made toward this goal. (centraljersey.com - 7.7.14)

After deciding as a congregation to take steps to be more environmentally sustainable, members of the Unitarian Universalist Church in Bloomington, Ill., learned that they could do even more if they became certified as a Green Sanctuary congregation by the UUA. They are actively completing a number of projects to achieve that goal. (pantagraph.com - 7.9.14)

The Shelter Neck Unitarian Universalist Camp in Burgaw, N.C., is a summer camp and retreat center with a rich historical connection to early Universalism in North Carolina and the Unitarian Universalist faith movement today. (StarNewsOnline.com - 7.4.14)

Categories: UU News

Evangelism, sweetness and love, religious bullying, and more

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-07-11 13:38
Evangelism, elevator speeches, and innovation

Justin Almeida’s first attempts to explain UUism to his new classmates were “a big ball of wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey stuff,” so he worked out a more formal elevator speech.

Unitarian Universalism is rooted in liberal Christianity and developed out of the reformation. It is now a pluralistic, non-creedal religion that believes truth resides in the individual as informed by experience, tradition, family, culture and history. We have seven principles which guide our congregations, all of which boil down to ‘there is one love and nobody is left behind. (What’s My Age Again?, July 9)

For Gracia Walker, simple loving presence is a form of evangelism.

I think to show love doesn’t mean you tell people where to go to church or if they should go to church. It just means you spend the time you have with them in a loving way. (Loved for Who You Are, July 9)

The Rev. Dr. David Breedon reminds us that a culture of loneliness is the context for our evangelism.

As the Beatles knew, denizens of post-industrial countries may exist in utter isolation. We often shop in anonymous supermarkets rather than bustling markets. We buy clothing off a hanger, not from the source of the craft. As Robert D. Putnam pointed out, many of us bowl alone. (Quest for Meaning, July 10)

Katy Schmidt Carpman notices that many programs that support innovation are cropping up within UUism.

It’s a ripe time for innovation.
What’s your big idea?
How will you change the world? (Remembering Attention, July 3)

Enough already

While shopping in Target, Colleen Thoelle has a flash of insight about accepting the person she is right now, letting go of regrets and fantasies about the past.

Should the goal be to not go back and dig up but to walk forward and look straight ahead? Should I leave “her” behind me and just be who I am right now? What in the hell is wrong with who you are right now?

Bam! Lightbulb. (Adventures of the Family Pants, July 10)

During a stressful summer of “mothering from afar,” Jordinn Nelson Long also struggles with the question of doing and being “enough.”

My faith tells me there is no hell, but amazingly, that doesn’t touch the fear of damnation here, on this earth.

Not by others. . . .

What I’m afraid of is bigger and deeper, a theological matter for our time. The final judge will be the limits of each 24 hour day and the reality of opportunity cost and the truth that to love is on some level to leave your heart lying helpless. (Raising Faith, July 4)

Religious freedom, religious bullying

The Rev. Marti Keller, responding to the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision, writes that “We need to find ways to talk about the ripples of oppression and harm that may inevitably stem from this ill-considered verdict while not losing focus on the women in this country who were originally targeted.” (Leaping from Our Spheres, July 10)

After a thorough examination of the court’s decision, Doug Muder concludes that Pandora’s box is open.

[Any] clever person can find a link of some sort between whatever they don’t want to do and the commission of some act they consider immoral by someone else. Alito is encouraging Christians to develop hyper-sensitive consciences that will then allow them to control or mistreat others in the name of religious liberty. . . .

I focus on Christians here for a very good reason: Given that this principle will produce complete anarchy if generally applied, it won’t be generally applied. (The Weekly Sift, July 7)

The Rev. Amy Zucker Morgenstern wants Unitarian Universalists to work for a more substantive conversation about abortion.

We wish to talk with others who struggle with these issues, not in order to concede to intolerable positions nor make peace with every opponent, but because they matter to us, and it is the duty both of a government and a civilization to grapple honestly with such questions. (Sermons in Stones, July 3)

John Beckett believes Americans too often confuse religious freedom and religious bullying.

Religious freedom means you are free to believe, worship, and practice as you see fit. It means you are free to advocate for your religion in the public square. It means you are free to live your life by your values and to encourage others to do the same.

It does not mean you are free to coerce others to believe, practice, or behave as you would prefer, nor does it mean you are free to ignore your obligations to our wider society.

That’s not freedom. That’s bullying. (Under the Ancient Oaks, July 3)

Sweetness and love

The Rev. Dr. Carl Gregg reflects on this year’s General Assembly theme.

Perhaps the biggest take away for me from General Assembly was the emphasis that “Love Reaches Out” means partnering to create social change with those whom you may in many ways differ from politically or theologically. (Pluralism, Pragmatism, Progressivism, July 8)

The Rev. Scott Wells objects to overly sentimental views of Universalism.

In the last generation, I’ve seen a revolting amount of ecclesiastic “mansplaining”: condescending depictions of Universalism, out of a Unitarian lens, to re-cast my tradition as something sweet, loving, emotive, poor, rural and homey. The whole thing reeks of Victorian sexual politics. (Boy in the Bands, July 6)

Categories: UU News

T-shirt Evangelism

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-07-09 01:00
Meg Riley, senior minister of the Church of the Larger Fellowship, shares how a t-shirt can be a tool for evangelism. She wrote, 'I put it on when I have something to say or do, to bring more love where love has been violated.
Wearing it grounds me when I’m afraid, helps me remember that I’m not
alone, and tells the world, including me, what I stand for.'
Categories: UU News

Area Churches Pursue a Social Media Ministry

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-07-09 01:00
Offering curious 'nones' the chance to look inside a UU service, congregations are now turning to digital media to attract new visitors. In this story, the Rev. Ann Marie Alderman of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greensboro talks about how her congregation puts their mobile devices in worship mode.
Categories: UU News

Unbottled

UU World - Mon, 2014-07-07 01:00
IDEAS: We've bottled everything from water to religion.
Categories: UU News

Helping to tip the scales

UU World - Mon, 2014-07-07 01:00
NEWS: UU Fellowship of Topeka’s decades of involvement on LGBT issues
Categories: UU News

UUs vote for divestment, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-07-04 02:32

Shareholder activism continues as part of resolution

In an overwhelming vote, UUs at the 2014 General Assembly in Providence, R.I., passed a resolution to divest the UUA’s Common Endowment Fund of shares in fossil fuel companies, while still maintaining ownership of enough shares to continue their work of shareholder advocacy. (Providence Journal – 6.29.14)

A delegate who participated in the vote for divestment during General Assembly noted that this move was one tactic in a larger strategy to work against our overdependence on fossil fuels. Well-known climate activist Bill McKibben also applauded the vote. (MintPressNews.com – 6.30.14)

Other articles on UUA divestment include:

“Unitarians Go Fossil Fuel Free With Divestment Resolution” (EcoWatch -  6.30.14)

“Unitarian Universalists Divest from Fossil Fuels!” (Eden Keeper – 7.2.14)

“Unitarian Universalists divest from fossil fuels” (Fairfield Citizen – 6.30.14)

Hobby Lobby case is politically motivated

In response to the recent Supreme Court ruling in favor of the religious freedom of corporations, the Rev. Marlin Lavanhar of All Souls Unitarian Church in Tulsa, Okla., observes that this ruling now makes it possible for corporations to use religion as a pretext for other political aims. (Tulsa World – 7.1.14)

Even Millennials will eventually need a religious community

Beacon Press author Chris Stedman interviews the Rev. Galen Guengerich, senior minister of All Souls Unitarian Church in New York City, on the necessary balance of science and reason and the importance of belonging to a specifically religious community. (Religion News Service – 7.2.14)

UUs support their local LGBT communities

The Rev. Jeff Liebmann, minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Midland, Mich., received the Champion of Pride award from Perceptions Saginaw Valley, a local LGBT rights organization. Liebmann was honored for his active and public support of the LGBT community as a faith leader. (mlive.com – 6.26.14)

Two Unitarian Universalist ministers in Pennsylvania applaud recent legal changes making same-sex marriage legal in the Commonwealth. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 6.30.14)

Members of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Myers, Fla., held a public witness event to show their support for same-sex marriage lawsuits in the state. (Fox 4 – 6.29.14)

Categories: UU News

Solidarity, brave souls, thoughtless choices, and more

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Thu, 2014-07-03 12:57
Prayerful solidarity

Inviting us to draw our own conclusions, the Rev. Meg Riley prays for Dr. Ersula Ore, assaulted by the police for the minor offense of jaywalking.

Dr. Ore, you are in my prayers today. You and the thousands of other people of color who are forced to prove that you have a right to walk home, and upon whom the burden of proof always rests. Please know that you are not alone—that tens of thousands of white people, as well as the people of color who share your experience of being told you don’t matter—are with you and will be with you as you ask for what everyone wants: Respect for your worth and dignity. (Quest for Meaning, June 30)

Supreme Court decisions

Patrick Murfin agrees with the Supreme Court’s recent decision about buffer zones around abortion clinics.

To protect our own rights of dissent, we must unfortunately defend someone else’s right to be an asshole.

That does not mean we have to step back and let wolves lose upon the sheep. It means we have to take action to confront the wolves ourselves, to offer our bodies, if necessary, in their protection. It demands a lot from us. Giving up comfort, giving up safety. It means, as the theme of this year’s GA says, Reaching Out in Love. (Heretic, Rebel, a Thing to Flout, June 27)

The Rev. Elz Curtiss suggests that William Ellery Channing’s book, Slavery, is useful for countering the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision.

Much of today’s political breakdown rests on the inability of secular and free-range left wing leaders to articulate a comprehensive philosophical counter to conservative religious arguments. Happily, William Ellery Channing has provided here, in one document, everything we need to lift our stature in current debates. (Politywonk, July 1)

Loved for who you are

“Loved for Who You Are” is a UU outreach project you can participate in by sharing its message, or sharing your story. For inspiration, here are a few posts from “Loved for Who You Are” this week.

The Rev. Dr. Cynthia Landrum believes that whether or not God exists, we are loved.

If God exists, quite frankly, I am loved. And you are, too.

But if God doesn’t exist, is the world cold and cruel? Is human life meaningless? Is love absent? Is there no reason to do good?

Of course not.

We are still precious and loved. (Loved for Who You Are, June 27)

Suzyn Smitth Webb argues for a mix-and-match approach to finding our life’s purpose.

We are so quick to define ourselves by our jobs alone in this world, when our respective purposes aren’t at all limited by what we do 9 to 5. . . . [What] the world needs . . . is garbage collectors who are great Moms who also lead scout troops and sing in choirs.

That is a life with purpose. (Loved for Who You Are, July 2)

Brave souls, thoughtless choices

The Rev. Tom Schade looked for stories of courage at General Assembly—ones that didn’t involve heights, fast-moving rivers, or fire.

I heard of a minister who changed the Christmas Eve order of service.

Another recently settled minister told the largest donor that no, they did not get to veto decisions of the Board.

Someone told a UU Republican that just because no one agreed with them, it didn’t mean they were oppressed. (The Lively Tradition, June 30)

For Adam Dyer, too many UUs at the General Assembly WaterFire event failed to live up to their promise to live “on the side of love.”

I watched yellow shirts push past, walk around and yes, even climb over residents who had been waiting for up to 2 hours to see this event. From my vantage point among the local crowd, what was intended to be a “witness” turned into more of a “display” and somewhat of a distraction. (Spirituwellness, June 29)

Religion, spirituality, and philosophy

Andrew Mackay responds to a recent article in Atlantic magazine, which criticizes the casual syncretism of contemporary spirituality.

Mobility in the spiritual realm should not be viewed as intrinsically bad. . . . The dynamic behavior of the newest generation may be a move past the sense of obligation and communal pressure to conform and stay in one religious institution.

To end, it is important to not oversell traditional religious practice, and to dismiss 21st century spirituality. The two have much to teach each other, if they will listen. (Unspoken Politics, June 29)

Alix answers her friends’ skeptical questions about Unitarian Universalism and ministry.

For me, Unitarian Universalism is a philosophy, a way of thinking about and organizing reality, the nature of knowledge, and existence. . . . AND yes, Unitarian Universalism is a religion because it’s not just a way of thinking about the world, but also a way of acting in it. (Doubled Up in Love, July 2)

Declaring independence

We’re publishing early this week because of Independence Day. Here’s some advice from Jacqueline Wolven to help you enjoy your weekend.

Get offline and start doing something. Anything. Take walks. Get a hobby that you love. Learn something new. Cook real meals. Dance badly in your living room. Really, anything would work to allow you to experience life in the way that you want to and not transfer all of the millions of emotions that you are experiencing from others online. (Jacqueline Wolven, June 28)

Categories: UU News

Unitarian Universalist Association approves fossil fuel divestment

UU World - Mon, 2014-06-30 01:00
NEWS: General Assembly vote endorses divestment, but allows for shareholder activism.
Categories: UU News

UUA President Deeply Concerned Over SCOTUS Decision

UUA Top Stories - Mon, 2014-06-30 01:00
UUA President Peter Morales issued a statement following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on the contraceptive mandate. He said, “This is yet another blow against reproductive rights. Removing the no-cost contraceptive coverage requirement in the Affordable Care Act dangerously diminishes the religious, moral, and legal rights of every American, but especially women.'
Categories: UU News

Thousands of UUs gather in Rhode Island, and other UUs in the Media

UU in the news - Sat, 2014-06-28 13:39

During its annual General Assembly (GA), held this year in Providence, R.I., the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) joined the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee at a rally outside the Renaissance Hotel to show low-wage workers some love. The crowd swelled to 250 people at one point, the majority of whom were GA attendees. (Providence Journal – 6.26.14)

Local Unitarian Universalist ministers, the Rev. Ellen Quadgraas and the Rev. James Ford, spoke at the rally outside the Renaissance Hotel on Thursday. Ford’s leadership on this issue helped guide the UUA to cancel its contract with the Renaissance prior to GA because of the hotel’s refusal to engage with workers over pay and union issues. (rifuture.org – 6.26.14)

The Providence Warwick Convention & Visitors Bureau was happy to report that attendance by 4,600 Unitarian Universalists at their General Assembly in downtown Providence would likely bring more than $4 million dollars in revenue to their city. (Providence Journal – 6.26.14)

The UUA will be the first ever faith sponsor of Providence’s downtown community and arts festival, WaterFire. The event will serve as the public witness component that is included each year at GA. Alex Kapitan, the UUA staff member organizing the event, joined WaterFire spokesperson Brownwyn Dannenfelser to discuss the Love Reaches Out theme. (wpri.com – 6.27.14)

 

Categories: UU News
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