UU News

Wedgwood: Beyond the table

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-27 01:00
IDEAS: The 'father of English potters' was also a Unitarian and an anti-slavery advocate.
Categories: UU News

Sale of mineral rights brings $944K to UUA

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-27 01:00
NEWS: Lois and Ken Carpenter's gift of mineral rights, once thought worthless, is windfall to UUA.
Categories: UU News

Board thanks Carpenters for $944K gift at October meeting

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-27 01:00
NEWS: UUA will not need loan from endowment, although financial challenges remain.
Categories: UU News

Sanctuary initiative holds Denver families together, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-10-24 14:27

Sanctuary seeker takes refuge from deportation at UU church

In an effort to avoid being forcibly deported by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Arturo Hernandez became Colorado’s first sanctuary seeker earlier this week, and has taken refuge at First Unitarian Society of Denver. Hernandez, a 15-year resident of the state, hopes to draw attention to the issue of immigration and the separation of immigrant families. (The Denver Post – 10.22.14)

Related story: 

First person in Colo. claims sanctuary to avoid deportation (Public News Service – 10.22.14)

Same-sex marriage ban lifted in Wyoming, other states

Same-sex marriages became legal in Wyoming earlier this week after State Attorney General Peter Michael filed a notice saying that the state will not appeal a judge’s order overturning its ban on same-sex ceremonies. Unitarian Universalist Church of Cheyenne minister, the Rev. Audette Fulbright, was on hand outside of the Laramie County Courthouse to oversee one of the state’s first same-sex ceremonies. (Wyoming Tribune Eagle – 10.21.14)

Related stories:

S.C. county awaits its first gay marriage after ruling (Nogales International – 10.21.14)

Gay marriage to begin in Wyoming (Wyoming Tribune Eagle – 10.21.14)

Same-sex marriage arrives in Wyoming (Wyoming Public Media – 10.21.14)

Idaho Falls church rejoices start of same-sex marriages (Local News 8 – 10.19.14)

Marriage equality in Fairfax and beyond (The Connection – 10.21.14)

UUs stand for racial justice, call to end police brutality

Residents of Rockford, Ill., rallied against police brutality this week in the wake of the unarmed shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, and called for an end to “unnecessarily aggressive police tactics, mass incarceration, and racism.” The protest was organized by the Unitarian Universalist Church in Rockford and the local Anti-Racism Network (MyStateLine.com – 10.23.14)

Related story: 

Race protest draws 75 in Montclair (TheAlternativePress.com – 10.23.14)

Categories: UU News

Canada, autumn, Ebola, and more UU writing

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-10-24 11:21
O Canada

The Rev. Bill Sinkford reacts to this week’s shooting in the Canadian Parliament.

I . . . heard the MP’s speak about yesterday’s attack and renew their commitment to preserve an open society. An open society? How long has it been since you could describe ours as an open society? . . .

At what sacrifice in personal privacy can safety from such attackers be purchased, if at all?

Is this the new normal, not just in Washington but throughout the world? (Rev. Sinkford’s Blog, October 23)

A season of letting go

Catherine Clarenbach writes about autumn as a season of relinquishment—and shares a personal story of grieving the loss of her father.

[Relinquishment] is not the same as giving up. Rather, we are making space as the leaf does, as the squash vine does, as the wind itself does. We can choose the manner of our relinquishments—not always, but sometimes. Sometimes we will resist with everything we have—denial, anger, bargaining—and sometimes it takes a while for our hands to stop trying to grasp so hard what is already gone. (The Way of the River, October 20)

The Rev. Dr. David Breeden celebrates the “sloppy wet kiss of here and now.”

Perhaps you
remember
from last year
those leaves,
that glow. Yet it
is here and only
here, this fall
only falls here. (Theopoetics, October 22)

Thoughts about Ebola

The Rev. Jude Geiger sees a common thread tying together ISIS, Ebola, and immigration.

I think the fear around ISIS (a Middle Eastern horror) and Ebola (a West African horror) and our Mexican border (where human beings are trying to work, migrate and find better homes for their children) is not about ISIS and Ebola, it’s about racism. We can’t argue against immigration reform with integrity, because most of us are descendants of immigrants from the past 100 years, so we need to come up with another way to keep Americans from trusting our neighbors from the South. (HuffPo Religion, October 21)

Doug Muder lists seven liberal lessons of Ebola, beginning with this:

Ebola points out why we need government. Libertarian rhetoric about sovereign individuals has a lot of superficial charm. But biology knows nothing about that; humanity is a species, and sometimes we have to act as a species. We do this through government. (The Weekly Sift, October 20)

Reading the Hebrew Scriptures

The Rev. Dr. Carl Gregg explores “the ways Christians have often appropriated Jewish scripture in a way that does not fully appreciate the ways that Jews understand their own texts in very differently.”

The conservative Christian tradition of my childhood taught me, when I read a passage in which a Gospel writer quoted a passage from the Hebrew prophets, that I should think, “Isn’t it amazing how that ancient prophecy predicted details about Jesus’ ministry?” But the more I explore the original context of the Hebrew prophets, the more I think that Isaiah would be dumbfounded by Matthew’s interpretation of his words.

So, how do we read the Bible more responsibly in light of this awareness? (Pluralism, Pragmatism, Progressivism, October 23)

The Rev. Tamara Lebak discovers that Leviticus mentions the Golden Rule twice—once as “love your neighbor,” and once as “love the stranger.”

In lifting up both neighbor and stranger, Leviticus seems to be lifting up that you cannot simply stop the conversation with those like you and pushes us to think about how we have indeed been strangers ourselves. (Under the Collar in Oklahoma, October 22)

Congregational life

The Rev. Dan Harper’s congregation is experiencing an increase in attendance—with a resulting increase in conflict, and in demands for time, energy, and space.

If you are wishing for your congregation to grow, remember that growth injects stress into the institution. In the short term, it is much easier and more pleasant to stay the same size, even if it does mean chasing lots of newcomers away. Only a fool, or someone committed to making the utopian ideals of liberal religion accessible to all who want them, would seek congregational growth. (Yet Another Unitarian Universalist, October 19)

Harper also writes a series of posts about participating in UNCO 14 West (“an unconference for church leaders, pastors, families, and seminarians”). (Yet Another Unitarian Universalist, October 20)

The Rev. Dawn Cooley considers ways to remove barriers to participation in UUA governance.

I believe that we need a robust Unitarian Universalist Association that can serve stakeholders that may or may not belong to a congregation. A UUA where all who meet certain “citizenship” requirements are able to participate, whether or not they are affiliated with a congregation. We have more free-range Unitarian Universalists than we do congregation members. Many of these folks were raised in our congregations. Might we want to allow them to have a say in the future of our faith tradition? (Speaking of, October 21)

The Rev. Adam Tierney Eliot writes about the rhythms of preaching—and the reality of dry spells.

For a good preaching ministry there must be a steady pattern of “study . . . preach . . . study again . . . preach again” that runs in the background seven days a week. When this stream is flowing steadily and well, worship is invested with the spirit and has spirit in the moment. If not, then the process is more like a person looking for the car key. There is a lot of wandering, swearing, self-doubt, and foolish relief at its final discovery. (The Burbania Posts, October 17)

Categories: UU News

'This is going to last'

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-20 01:00
NEWS: After Supreme Court action, same-sex marriage now legal in 32 states.
Categories: UU News

O gremlins, O St. Anthony!

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-20 01:00
SPIRIT: My faith is in science, but I try to keep an open mind.
Categories: UU News

Renaming Columbus Day, growing marriage equality, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-10-17 18:27

Sudbury UUs honor indigenous peoples

First Parish of Sudbury, Mass., joined in the effort to change the focus of the Columbus Day holiday to recognize the culture and contributions of Native Americans by celebrating “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” in their church. Describing Christopher Columbus as a man who exemplified “the worst of what human kind has to offer,” the Rev. Dr. Marjorie Matty said in her sermon, “Some traditions are just not worth carrying forward.” (MetroWest Daily News – 10.13.14)

UU church offering free wedding ceremonies for same-sex couples

In the wake of the recent Supreme Court ruling that ended the ban on same-sex marriage in some states, Olympia Brown UU Church minister the Rev. Tony Larsen will be performing free wedding ceremonies for same-sex couples at the Racine, Wisc., church over the next few weeks. Larsen and his longtime partner were the first couple to receive a marriage license in Racine County. (Journal-Times – 10.14.14)

Related stories include:

Lesbian ministers declare victory (MyFoxOrlando.com – 10.14.14 )

Same-sex marriages continue in Wake Co. after ruling (WNCN.com – 10.11.14)

Church leaders address legalization of same-sex marriage (Time-Warner News – 10.12.14)

Eau Claire lesbian couple led relentless fight for marriage equality in Wis. (Leader-Telegram – 10.12.14)

South Fork UUs celebrate 30 years

The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the South Fork in Bridgehampton, N.Y., will celebrate its 30th anniversary by holding a special “homecoming” service. (Sag Harbor Express – 10.15.14)

Pennsylvania UUs gather in interfaith solidarity

In response to a seminar titled “Islam, Christianity: The Coming Conflict,” an interfaith group of Unitarians, Jews, Christians, Pagans, Muslims, and atheists gathered in Sunbury, Pa., to showcase the peaceful relationships amongst the various groups. “We wanted to organize this interfaith grouping tonight because we believe in putting love out in the world,” said UU Congregation of the Susquehanna Valley minister the Rev. Ann Keeler Evans. (The Daily Item – 10.10.14)

Rallying for reproductive justice in North Dakota

A November ballot initiative in North Dakota that seeks to protect existing laws regulating abortion has come under scrutiny from local groups and faith communities. With the potential to prevent judicial activism that could grant the right to unlimited abortion in the future, the initiative also raises concerns with members of Bismarck-Mandan Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. (Bismark Tribune – 10.11.14)

 

 

Categories: UU News

Same-sex marriage gaining ground, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-10-17 15:08

Virginia’s first same-sex wedding performed by UU minister

Thirty U.S. states now have marriage equality following the Supreme Court’s decision earlier this week to refuse to hear appeals from five states seeking to prohibit same-sex marriage. The Rev. Linda Olson Peebles of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Arlington, Va., was on hand at the Arlington County Courthouse to perform the state’s first same-sex wedding ceremony. “The Commonwealth of Virginia agrees with us that every person has worth and dignity and that love matters no matter what your sexual orientation is,” she said. (ARL Now – 10.6.14)

Related stories include:

Same-sex couples begin to marry in Virginia (Washington Post – 10.6.14)

Supreme Court’s decision on Indiana’s same-sex marriage ban kills opposition for “foreseeable future” (Elkhart Truth – 10.6.14)

Falls Church couple seizes the moment after Virginia allows same-sex marriages (Washington Post – 10.6.14)

GOP legislative leaders ask to intervene in NC gay marriage cases (WRAL.com – 10.9.14)

The Rev. Audette Fulbright Fulson of the UU Church of Cheyenne, Wyo., wrote in to tell us that she and two members of the congregation were featured in two front page stories this week in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle on the state’s continued ban on same-sex marriage. The articles are not easy to access online, but at least one is on the paper’s website. (Wyoming Eagle Tribue – 10.8.13)

UUA HQ designed to foster collaboration

Many modern office buildings now use open concept designs to foster a sense of community at the workplace and create more opportunities for inter-office collaboration. The Boston Globe looks at the UUA’s new headquarters and other office spaces designed with that mindset. (Boston Globe – 10.8.14)

Michigan UUs collect shoes for charity

Contributing to the national nonprofit organization, Soles4Souls, New Hope Unitarian Universalist congregation members in New Hudson, Mich., have worked to organize shoe drives in their community, and have collected more than 800 pairs of shoes over the last three years. (hometownlife.com – 10.6.14)

Texas church celebrates 60th anniversary

Celebrating their 60th anniversary as a congregation, the Unitarian Universalist Church of Midland, Tex., and the Rev. Thomas Schmidt are taking advantage by welcoming community members to come and learn more about Unitarian Universalism, and to dispel any misconceptions about the faith. (Midland Reporter Telegram – 10.9.14)

Categories: UU News

Who are my people? and more UU commentary

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-10-17 10:08
Who are my people?

Kenny Wiley, who is both UU and black, wonders if his UU community cares more about remembering Selma than engaging in Ferguson.

Unitarian Universalists, you are my people. And UUs, my ‘other’ people—of which some of you are—need you. We need you to show up. We need you to listen and go beyond platitudes. Not everyone can travel hundreds of miles, but we can all do something—something beyond what we thought we could do. Oct. 22 is National Day Against Police Brutality, and several cities are hosting events.

The next call to action for racial justice has arrived. My people: Will we answer?

My people want to know. (A Full Day, October 15)

The Rev. Tom Schade explores the reasons why there has been no national UU call to Ferguson, and proposes more grassroots, local-driven engagement.

The tragedy is that each of those 59 congregations within 250 miles of Ferguson had some people who wanted to go Ferguson, but didn’t hear the invitation, or feel encouraged by their local congregational leaders and minister. And even more tragic, in each of those 59 communities and cities, there were many more people who wanted to go to Ferguson, but were not connected with anyone, any group, who could help them make that happen.

We need to get to the next stage. We don’t need to count how many UU’s turn out for events like Ferguson, or Raleigh, or New York, or Arizona. We need to start to count how many non-UU’s we bring with us. (The Lively Tradition, October 15)

The St. Louis-area UU congregations are organizing their responses through the St. Louis Standing on the Side of Love Facebook page.

Faithful relationships

In a widely-shared post, the Rev. Dr. Victoria Weinstein responds to the news that the new president of Andover Newton Theological School admitted to a four-year affair.

I am first and foremost personally concerned about covenantal relationships –marriage being the most important one in this situation. It concerns me that my alma mater’s president should have violated the covenant of marriage for a long period of time, and that he and the board of trustees ask our forgiveness for that violation. (PeaceBang, October 4; published in modified form at The Narthex, October 6; quoted in the Boston Globe, October 12)

Liz James writes a searingly honest post about her own struggles with marital fidelity, and concludes that relationships need better tools and supports.

If we care about these stories, if we truly see pain and harm caused by this pattern, and we want to prevent it, we will not frame this conversation solely in terms of what this guy did wrong (not that there isn’t a place for this conversation, but that place sure isn’t my blog). We will ask what better support and context we can provide people as a community to support them in building relationships that are loving, sustainable, honest, and rewarding. We will talk real stories and real life.

Because this matters WAY too much to waste time getting judgemental when we could be getting creative and wise. (Rebel With a Label Maker, October 16)

The stories of our lives

Recovering from a migraine, the Rev. Cynthia Cain boards an airplane, and her seatmate’s drunkenness triggers memories of family dysfunction; after her first feelings of anger, she finds her way to compassion.

I looked at Mr. Reeking of Alcohol, and his one eye was completely bloodshot, and I felt so much sadness and compassion for him. I knew that like some people very close to me he was trapped in a place he could not get out of and didn’t need my scorn and anger.

So when he suggested I relax, instead of launching into aforementioned rant, I smiled at him.

“I’m trying, bro.” I said. (A Jersey Girl in Kentucky, October 14)

Karen Johnston urges a mourner to “forget pious blessing chatter.”

Forget pious blessing chatter.
The nice-nice that assures polite company
the world still spins properly.

It doesn’t.
It’s off kilter.
Your son is gone.
All is not right
in the world. (irrevspeckay, October 15)

The problem of oversimplification

The Rev. Dr. Cynthia Landrum pushes back against oversimplification in how schools react to students’ infractions.

We need to, as a society, rethink “zero tolerance” and “three strikes” laws. We need to rethink them when it comes to our prisons, but we also need to rethink them when it comes to our schools, and we need to stop treating children like criminals. We need to give the schools the ability to look at the situation and look at the individual child, to think about what’s best for the school and what’s best for the child.

In liberal religion, we often talk about how much we value education. It’s time for us to recognize that this is a major way in which some children are not getting the same access to education that others are, and work to make a change. (The Lively Tradition, October 14)

Doug Muder writes that the real problem with Sam Harris and Bill Maher, and their comments about Islam, is “Orientalism,” fencing off a group of people, and then presuming to be an expert about their lives.

The reason to pause before you criticize Islam or religion isn’t that these topics are or should be surrounded by some special aura of protection. It’s that there’s really no such thing as Islam or religion, at least not in the sense that most critics would like to assume. (The Weekly Sift, October 13)

Categories: UU News

Looking to get more involved in climate justice? Commit2Respond

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-13 01:00
NEWS: A movement open to all, calling all to action on a moral imperative.
Categories: UU News

The boots worked either way

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-13 01:00
IDEAS: Be aware of the tensions in your life and the awareness can be an ally.
Categories: UU News

Off the beaten path

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-10-10 15:34

Sorry, everyone, Heather Christensen isn’t back yet. Instead you have a highly irreverent sample of social media we don’t usually cover!


[View the story "Off the beaten path" on Storify]
Categories: UU News

Restored to Sanity Available Now

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-10-08 01:00
Restored to Sanity: Essays on the Twelve Steps by Unitarian Universalists , is the newest release from Skinner House Books, and the first to explore the intersection of UUism and Twelve-Step recovery programs. In this book, each Step is explored with two heartfelt essays, plus a meditation or prayer, making it ideal for small groups to read and discuss, or for individual reflection.
Categories: UU News

Will You Commit2Respond?

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-10-08 01:00
We are facing a climate crisis. Recognizing the interdependence of all life, we are called as people of faith and conscience to heal and sustain the planet we call home. Climate change is a moral issue, and Commit2Respond is our moral response. UUs and all people of faith and conscience are invited to join this brand new initiative for climate justice.
Categories: UU News

Breakthrough Congregation: UU Church of Boulder, CO

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-10-08 01:00
UU World shares the transformational story of the UU Church of Boulder, CO. It reads, 'Just five years ago, things were so bleak at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Boulder, Colorado, that there was a question as to how much longer it would survive.' Find out how they turned things around and are now thriving!
Categories: UU News

Alzheimer's caregiving takes a village

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-06 01:00
LIFE: How UUs can better serve people with dementia and their loved ones.
Categories: UU News

80 congregations now hire membership professionals

UU World - Mon, 2014-10-06 01:00
NEWS: Most UUA growth last year happened in congregations with paid membership coordinators.
Categories: UU News

Institutional blogging, youth voices, social justice

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-10-03 17:30

The Interdependent Web does not usually cover “institutional” blogs and social media, but this week we will highlight recent posts in several official UUA communications streams.

Youth voices

Kara Marler says lots of adults think she has “potential.”

Potential are the forces you have yet to believe in

We are not potential

We are a force that someone believes in (Blue Boat of Youth and Young Adult Ministries, September 24)

Kara Rocks the Pulpit from UUAYaYA on Vimeo.

Social justice

Gail Forsyth-Vail says teaching about Ferguson is not “optional” for white people.

What if talking about race was akin to talking about sexuality? Difficult, yes, but integral to good parenting? What if white people wanted their kids to be not just sexually healthy, but also racially healthy, able to meet, engage, and negotiate complex conversations, relationships, and situations by drawing on a well-formed racial identity based on good information, liberal religious values, and a strong sense of justice? What if white parents believed it was just as important for children to speak for racial justice as it is for them to believe in and speak for the integrity of their own body and sexuality? (Call and Response: Journeys in UU Lifespan Faith Development, September 30)

Standing on the Side of Love is committed to getting out the vote and shares a guest post from Sister Simone Campbell and the “Nuns on the Bus.”

Our shiny new bus is emblazoned with the words “We the People, We the Voters” because our trip is focused on how we, the community of voters, have the power to come together and make things right. It’s all about democracy. (Standing on the Side of Love, September 29)

The UU-UNO Office brought together a variety of voices to reflect on the People’s Climate March.

We all saw the humanity in one another, we were connected spiritually and emotionally, and we moved as one strong body. The UU-UNO participated in the march held in New York City and thanks to screens set-up throughout the march we were able to see marches in other countries. Many international participants in the NYC march wore the flag of their country proudly. Humans working in solidarity around the world as global citizens and participants of this movement. —Kamila Jacob, Envoy Coordinator (UUA International, September 26)

The Church of the Larger Fellowship’s weekly talk show, The VUU, has UU World contributing editor Doug Muder as a guest this week, talking about the Tea Party and the “Confederate Party.”

Timely publications

Beacon Press author Susan Katz Miller has advice for interfaith families during the Jewish High Holy Days.

1. Pick one. Even if you are going to practice only, or primarily, one religion in the home, your family will benefit from finding a progressive house of worship that welcomes you as an interfaith family. Many churches welcome interfaith families, though few have programs specifically for us. (Beacon Broadside, October 3)

Beacon Press also has an active Twitter account, and announces monthly “UU Reads,” such as October’s An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States.

Skinner House Books uses Tumblr to assemble UU-related and book-related posts, such as this graphic from the UU Media Collective (which WordPress doesn’t reduce at all nicely; do click through to see the full-size version!).

Growing Unitarian Universalism

Tandi Rogers bids farewell to InterConnections and thanks our colleague Don Skinner.

One of the themes of InterConnections has been the power of one person to change a congregation. For good or ill. One person can plant an idea and then gather support for it. One person can encourage someone else. (Growing Unitarian Universalism, September 16)

Mark Bernstein thinks leaders should “go with the flow.”

The more leaders see their tasks as interesting, enjoyable, and meaningful, the harder and longer they work on the task and the better they will perform at it. (Growing Vital Leaders: Ideas, Tips and Tools on Leadership Formation, September 26)

Categories: UU News

UU church is clean energy leader, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-10-03 13:54

UU church is clean energy leader

Recognized as a clean energy leader, the Unitarian Universalist Church of Elgin, Ill., will be one of more than 60 sites across the state to be featured on the Illinois Solar Tour this month. Coordinated nationally by the American Solar Energy Society, the statewide tour demonstrates how innovative technologies used locally can benefit the environment on a global level. (The Courier-News – 9.29.14)

Raising awareness for domestic violence in Maryland

The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Harford County, Md., will host its annual Silent Witness Program in observance of Domestic Violence Awareness month. Wooden silhouettes representing real victims of domestic violence will be unveiled during a special ceremony on the lawn of the church. (Baltimore Sun – 10.3.14)

OUT MetroWest expands program, mission

A gay, lesbian, and transgender youth support program launched three years ago by the Unitarian Universalist Church of Wellesley, Mass., now has a new name and expanded mission. The newly formed nonprofit, OUT MetroWest, plans to increase support services for middle school students and teens in need. Executive Director Jack Lewis said he will seek “community involvement and input from the schools and faith leaders’’ in order to provide a safe place for teens to explore questions of gender and orientation. (Wicked Local – 9.28.14)

Pennsylvania minister shows support for minimum-wage hike

The Rev. Peter Friedrichs of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Delaware County, Pa., joined local politicians, union representatives, and community groups at the Delaware County Courthouse earlier this week to show support for raising the minimum wage. (Philly.com – 10.1.14)

Summit UUs rally en masse for climate action

Two hired buses helped carry over 100 members of the Unitarian Church in Summit, N.J., to the People’s Climate March in New York City late last month to stand alongside the estimated 350,000 participants calling on world leaders for immediate climate action. “It was inspiring to be part of an ever growing stream of folks committed to saving our place on the planet,” said senior interim minister the Rev. Terry Sweetser. (Alternative Press – 9.29.14)

Church hires first full-time, female minister

A central Massachusetts church hired the first full-time, female minister in its 272-year history. Taking over the pulpit at First Church in Sterling, an interdenominational church of Unitarian Universalists and members of the United Church of Christ, the Rev. Robin Bartlett will now focus on establishing an “open and affirming process” and will make a public covenant of welcome to all in the church, regardless of sexual orientation. (The Landmark – 10.2.14)

Categories: UU News
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