UU News

Committee aims to amend U.S. Constitution, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-08-29 14:13

Citizens for Economic Justice argues only human beings are people

An offshoot of the social justice committee of the Unitarian Universalist Society of Fairhaven, Conn., Citizens for Economic Justice, has begun gathering signatures in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, which granted free speech protection to the political contributions of corporations. The group is associated with the national Move to Amend organization, which seeks to amend the Constitution so that the Bill of Rights applies only to human beings. Voters in the state’s 10th Bristol District will vote on the amendment in November. (South Coast Today – 8.27.14)

Climate change supporters gather in Iowa

Cross-country marchers visited Davenport, Iowa, earlier this week as part of the Walkers on the Great March for Climate Action. The walkers, who left Los Angeles in March and are expected to reach Washington, D.C., by early November, drew a large crowd of supporters, including members of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Quad-Cities, Davenport. UU minister the Rev. Jay Wolin told those attending “We are one with the universe. If we harm it, we harm ourselves. Let us walk gently upon the earth.” (Quad-City Times – 8.24.14)

Other climate news:

Earth and Spirit: Marching for our climate (Wicked Local – 8.23.14)

More from UUs and congregations

A week after a request to remove a deportation order was denied, fifteen-year Tucson, Ariz., resident Rose Imelda Robles Loreto continues to live in a Tucson church while support for her cause grows. More than 3,250 have signed a website petition asking President Barack Obama to close Loreto’s case. The Rev. Matthew Crary and members of the Santa Rita Choral from the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Amado, Ariz., have launched a website to bolster Loreto and other supporters. (Green Valley News and Sun – 8.24.14)

Disappointed by the latest ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court delaying same-sex marriage in Virginia, the Rev. Scott Sammler-Michael of Accotink Unitarian Universalist Church in Burke, Va., remains prepared to perform wedding ceremonies. “It’s an amazing time to live through all this stuff,” he said, “where it looks like we’ve regressed 40 years; but you take a couple steps forward, a couple steps back. You’ve gotta hope that you can enjoy the show.” (The Connection – 8.27.14)

Categories: UU News

Too soon to heal, love is not enough, and more UU writing

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-08-29 13:33
Too soon to heal

Kim Hampton resists pressure to begin the healing process after the death of Michael Brown.

Too often in the U.S., black people and black communities are asked to start the healing (or reconciliation or forgiveness) process before our slaughtered are even buried . . . .

How can a community heal when a knife is stuck in their back 10 inches, brought back out, and then plunged in again? (East of Midnight, August 24)

The Rev. Cynthia Cain is not ready to “move on.”

Unlike our President and so many others, I do not pray for an end to the protests in Ferguson and for peace at all costs. Not if peace means people have gone back to sleep. Let them stand up, even with anger if that is what it takes, and let this rage spread as far as it must, for ignoring this situation has not made it better, only worse. (A Jersey Girl in Kentucky, August 23)

The Rev. James Ford marks the anniversary of the murder of Emmett Till.

So much has been accomplished since then.

And so much that is so deeply wrong continues. As long as someone’s life is in greater danger in this country because of the color of their skin, we need to keep the issue alive, to not allow ourselves to lull into some state of denial.

We need to remember. (Monkey Mind, August 28)

Love is not enough

Pushing back against “Standing on the Side of Love,” Christine Slocum says, “Love is not enough on its own.”

We need love, and we are loved, and there is more to do. The next time you hear, “God is love,” ask yourself, “so then what?” What are you doing because of this love that you have? How do you improve the world because you are loved? The world needs love, and it needs more. Never forget that. (Loved for Who You Are, August 25)

When an African-American colleague tells the story of a traumatic encounter with the police when she was three years old, the Rev. Meg Riley writes, “I am stopped in my tracks, recognizing anew how totally and completely I will never know anything but my own (white) experience.”

From that moment on, in every other memory she carries, she has woven in a lack of safety and a constant threat that I can never imagine. Because she is joyful and generous, because she lives with a giant heart and spirit, I presume that she and I more or less inhabit the same planet. And then I hear just this tiniest formational sliver of her story and I realize I haven’t the faintest idea how she professes and lives her theology of love for people of all races. (HuffPo Religion, August 28)

Andrew Mackay considers the role of outsiders in working for change.

Though there are moral principles at stake here, the question those who wish to help need to ask is “if we can, how can we help you?” versus “I know what can help you.” Respect for autonomy, whether in the black community, or indigenous peoples fighting Chevron and mining companies, or whatever group is engaged in struggle, is important. Part of the Freedom Summer was allowing the oppressed to gain political tools to use against their oppressors. Supplying power to others, not using your own power in their name. (Unspoken Politics, August 26)

The Rev. Thomas Perchlik, who ministers in the St. Louis area, offers suggestions about how people can respond to Ferguson.

The best way you can stand in solidarity with us is to look at your own community. If it has not been done, look at how often police in your area stop people of color in proportion to their percentage of the population. Talk to people in your community about how much they trust the police officers to protect them. Ask the Police if they feel trusted. (Rev. Thomas Perchlik’s Weblog, August 22)

Looking back

As he celebrates 20 years as a religious educator, the Rev. Dan Harper takes stock of his experiences.

So why have I stuck with it? Well, I still believe that religious education is important. Occasionally I have seen our congregations save the lives of children and adolescents; more often, I have seen congregations serve as anchors for kids, stabilizing influences in their lives. Equally importantly, now that so many adults come to our congregations with no background in organized religion, religious education for adults becomes increasingly central to congregational life. (Yet Another Unitarian Universalist, August 28)

Andrew Hidas remembers the advice of a long-ago spiritual director.

Live. Be involved. Do. Move. Quit dividing the world into sacred and secular, spiritual and profane, body and mind. Don’t worry about the “What,” just make sure you get after the “Do.” (Traversing, August 22)

Organizing for mission and usefulness

The Rev. Dawn Cooley suggest a “6H” approach to organizing congregational mission—healing, holding, hearing, helping, handing off, and homecoming. Here’s the first H, healing:

HEALING those participants who are spiritually wounded and struggling, providing resources (such as pastoral care and counseling) to those in spiritual need who choose to participate in the life of the congregation. So many people come to us desperate for our message of love and acceptance. And so many of those already with us have crises in our lives during which we need a community of love and support. Before any of the other steps can take place, people need to be spiritually rejuvenated. (Speaking of, August 25)

Cooley also applies the 6H approach to making the UUA a “relentlessly useful” organization. (The Lively Tradition, August 28)

Knowing and unknowing

The Rev. Dr. David Breeden thinks of agnosticism as a spiritual practice.

Contrary to the cliche, agnosticism isn’t about not deciding. It’s about honestly facing what we know about knowing itself. It is, as the Victorian biologist, T.H. Huxley, who coined the term, said, “not a creed but a method.” (Quest for Meaning, August 28)

The Rev. Dr. Carl Gregg revisits the biblical story of Eve and the tree of knowledge.

This connection is intentional between being mature enough to comprehend moral complexity (good and evil) and being mature enough to be self-aware of adult sexuality. The capability of understanding the messiness, complexity, and gray-areas associated with adult moral reasoning emerges around the same time as adolescence and puberty. So in the trajectory of human psycho-sexual development, we can see the root of that correlation between eating the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil and one’s body beginning to come into fruition (if you will) in a way that brings a very different kind of knowledge — a carnal knowledge sometimes called a “loss of innocence.” And once you “eat of such fruit,” childhood innocence is lost — just as Adam and Eve could never go back to their previous naked and carefree life in the Garden. (Pluralism, Pragmatism, Progressivism, August 28)

Categories: UU News

A UUA Breakthrough Congregation: First Parish in Bedford, MA

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-08-27 14:16
UU World profiles First Parish in Bedford, MA which the UUA named as a “Breakthrough Congregation” this year for its sustained growth. Membership has doubled since the Rev. John Gibbons started there twenty-three years ago and is projected to break 400 this year. Read how they made real growth happen in their congregation.
Categories: UU News

UUs Rally For Marriage Equality in Four States

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-08-27 14:16
In Maine, Maryland, and Washington, there are measures on the ballot that would authorize same-sex marriage. In Minnesota, marriage equality advocates are working to get out a “No” vote next month on a legislative measure that was passed to prevent same-sex marriage. In all four states Unitarian Universalists are deeply engaged, hoping for outcomes that favor marriage equality. Learn more about their important work in this article from UU World .
Categories: UU News

UU-UNO 50th Anniversary: Tickets Are On Sale Now

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-08-27 14:16
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Unitarian Universalist United Nations Office (UU-UNO)! For 50 years, the UU-UNO has worked to support international human rights, climate change policies, security and peace building for women, and many other issues. We invite you to attend our anniversary celebration in New York City on November 3rd, 2012. Tickets are on sale now through Oct 20th. Buy your ticket before Sept 30th and receive a discounted rate. Celebrate in your congregations and come celebrate with us!
Categories: UU News

Interfaith Leaders Urge President to Act on Immigration

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-08-27 01:00
In the wake of Congress’ inability to act, UUA President Rev. Peter Morales and other national faith leaders have delivered a letter to President Obama today, urging him to take administrative action on immigration reform and to end the inhumane immigration enforcement policies that destroy families .
Categories: UU News

Missouri UUs Hold Vigils, Collect Food for Ferguson

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-08-27 01:00
UU World reports on what local UUs in Missouri and UUs across the country are doing to support those in the Ferguson community including holding vigils and collecting food and supplies.
Categories: UU News

Selling the seeds of change

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-25 01:00
LIFE: A UU-founded company is on a mission to reclaim our seed heritage.
Categories: UU News

UUA balances budget with cuts, $400K loan from endowment

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-25 01:00
NEWS: Board approves revised budget to address $1.3 million shortfall; 'InterConnections' ceases publication.
Categories: UU News

Missouri UUs hold vigils, collect food for Ferguson

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-25 01:00
NEWS: UUA president decries 'profoundly unsettling' images of police action after killing of Michael Brown.
Categories: UU News

Same-sex marriage on hold in Virginia, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-08-22 14:09

Supreme Court blocks same-sex marriage in Virginia

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed earlier this week to delay an appeals court ruling that would strike down Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage. A constitutional amendment approved by Virginia voters in 2006 banned same-sex marriage and prohibited the recognition of legal marriages performed in other states. A network of state clergy, including the Rev. Linda Olson Peebles of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Arlington, Va., have planned to attend courthouses across the state to begin performing wedding ceremonies once the ban is lifted. “It’s been a long journey,” she said. “We’re letting everybody know we’re going to be ready to join in Virginia moving forward, letting go of its sad history and moving forward.” (CBS News - 8.20.14)

Related stories:

“Clergy preparing for same-sex marriage ceremonies” (NBC 29 – 8.19.14)

“Same-sex marriage in Virginia blocked by Supreme Court” (WSET.com - 8.20.14)

Arizona UUs reach out to immigrants seeking sanctuary

Facing a deportation order, Mexico native Rosa Imelda Robles Loreto has taken sanctuary at the Southside Presbyterian Church in Tucson, Ariz., where community members have gathered in support of the 15-year Tucson resident, including the Rev. Matthew Cray and members of the UU Church in Amado, Ariz.. The Amado congregation has considered becoming a sanctuary church for other immigrants and is looking at how it can address needs in the community. (Green Valley News and Sun – 8.18.14)

Related stories:

“Child migrant crisis prompts some to open their homes” (KGOU.org – 8.17.14)

“Thousands of locals show support for woman in sanctuary” (KVOA.com – 8.21.14)

UUs work for social justice

One hundred people marched in a clergy-organized rally calling for the replacement of St. Louis County Prosecutor Robert P. McCulloch in the wake of the shooting death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown. The Rev. Julie Taylor, rally participant and minister at Emerson Unitarian Universalist Church in Ellisville, Mo., said she had been to Ferguson and believed that clergy there had reduced tensions and saved lives. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch – 8.21.14)

In a Moral Week of Action event, the Rev. Lynda Smith of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Athens, Ohio, joined clergy from various faith traditions in front of the Ohio Statehouse to kick off a week of prayer aimed at encouraging legislators to govern with morality. (Columbus Dispatch – 8.22.14)

One Colorado, the state’s largest gay-rights group, awarded the Rev. Mike Morran of First Unitarian Society of Denver with one of six 2014 Ally Awards in recognition of his “efforts in advancing equality and making a difference in the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Coloradans.” Morran has been officiating commitment ceremonies for LGBT families for 17 years and worked to organize Colorado Clergy for Equality in Marriage. (Denver Post – 8.15.14)

Categories: UU News

Ferguson, mental health, radical love, and more

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-08-22 10:17
Who speaks for Ferguson?

Plaidshoes, a twenty-year resident of the St. Louis area, is frustrated by opinionated outsiders and “agitators.”

I can’t tell you how frustrating it is to hear people pontificating on the circumstances of Ferguson when they don’t even live in the area. Ferguson, and the St. Louis metro area as a whole, is complicated. I have lived here twenty years and I am sure I don’t have a full grasp of all the nuances, especially in terms of race and class. . . . We aren’t going to get the answers with everyone distorting the truth—especially from those who aren’t from the area. I can only pray that the agitators back down so that the true work of justice can begin. (Everyday Unitarian, August 20)

Kim Hampton, with a longer family history in St. Louis, disagrees with Plaidshoes.

White Ferguson is living their life as if nothing has really changed all that much. . . . So while I understand Plaidshoes’ wish that the ‘agitators’ (a loaded term) would stop stirring up things, from my side of the divide, without those agitators Michael Brown would have been just another black kid who got killed by the police for doing nothing other than being black in a public space. (East of Midnight, August 20)

The Rev. Susan Maginn has deep family roots in the Ferguson area.

Here we are, all of us, the whole nation, the whole world looking at Ferguson, Missouri and feeling these questions arise that really have no answer. Are the decades and centuries of racial injustice just too heavy to completely heal? Are the echoes of ancestral sins so painfully loud that the best we can do is to move away from each other, to live in different parts of town, to steal from each other, to imprison and kill each other. . . ?

We look at Ferguson today and we see how real and unsettling these questions are. We see how easy it is for most of us white people to just move away from these questions if we want to. But not today. Even if you have never stepped foot in Missouri, for today at least, Ferguson is your messy ancestral home too. (Quest for Meaning, August 15)

Liz James admits that she understands “nothing about what it’s like to be a black person on the streets of Ferguson.”

Privilege does not call me to try to switch roles and become like the oppressed. That doesn’t work, and also it seems to me that the main point of that would be to make myself feel like a better person. When I say I don’t know what I am talking about, I don’t mean that I should feel bad for that. I mean that I should recognize it, so that I will channel my rage, guilt, frustration, and sadness in the right ways. Into learning about the things that I have realized I don’t know.

We are not called to become guilt-ridden. We are called to become useful. (Rebel with a Labelmaker, August 21)

We will never get used to it

Lena Gardner writes that she will never “get used to” the stress of police harassment.

Someone on Facebook said they are just so tired of hearing Black people ‘complain’ about the police. There are many responses one could have to that, but my response is this: We will never get used to it. We will never get used to the police killing our children when the police could make another choice that would mean life instead of death. (Spirit, Soul and Journeying, August 18)

Karen Johnston takes “the Ferguson challenge”—talking to an African-American taxi driver about “what life is really like in this country from the lived experience of a person of color.” (irrevspeckay, August 21)

The big picture

Kim Hampton looks at Ferguson in light of the story of Abraham, Sarah, Hagar, Ishmael and Isaac.

Slavery created a dynamic in this country that not enough people want to recognize. Just like Hagar and Ishmael there is the misuse and abuse of black bodies and then the discarding of them as if they were the problem.

America, like Abraham, sacrificed one child for another. And just like Abraham, America has to live with the consequences of that decision. (East of Midnight, August 19)

Doug Muder provides an overview of the subtle (and not-so-subtle) forms of racism at work in Ferguson.

“This is a test,” Missouri Governor Jay Nixon said. But it’s not just the people of Ferguson or the police or Nixon himself who are being tested this week. It’s all of us. As we watch events unfold, in how many ways do they just look different because of race? How hard is it to back up, re-examine our initial framing, and ask ourselves what we’d be thinking if race were not a factor? (The Weekly Sift, August 18)

The Rev. Peter Boulatta calls Ferguson an American intifada.

To be sure, it is not a perfect analogy, but the sight of popular civilian protests facing off against an army firing tear gas and rubber bullets into the crowds, training their automatic weapons on civilians as they patrolled the streets in helmets and camouflage, seemed apropos. (Held in the Light, August 20)

Enough already

The Rev. Theresa Novak, tired of preventable pain, says, “Enough already.”

Everyone must die
Pain is part of life
We can’t do much
About earthquakes
And only some about disease
But we are here
To make it better
Not worse
Enough already (Sermons, Poetry, and Other Musings, August 18)

The Rev. Dawn Cooley struggles with feeling powerless about Ferguson.

So many of us are hurting, overwhelmed by the issues going on in Ferguson and elsewhere around the country. We may want to just ignore it, but since it is not going away, we get drawn in.

Our pain is a testament to our interconnection. We hurt, seeing and hearing about these events, because we know we are connected to those who are suffering, in Ferguson and beyond. We have an innate capacity for compassion, to want to reduce suffering if we can. And right now, many of us feel impotent. “What can I do about it?” we may ask ourselves. (Speaking of, August 20)

The Rev. Dr. David Breeden tends to be cynical about change, but hopes smart phones might make a difference.

The new technology brought about the Arab Spring, and it might—it could—begin to dismantle the current US system of black oppression.
Violence against this systematic oppression is not the answer. Neither is a brief paroxysm of national outrage. The violence will stop only when we the people catch the acts and put them on television and across the web. . . .

I can’t speak for the people across the river in Missouri, but this white guy, a descendent of Confederates and white supremacists, would like to see an end to the violence and oppression. (Quest for Meaning, August 21)

Faces of depression

Liz James joins the conversation about mental health, hoping that her story helps to decrease stigma.

Mental health ebbs and flows. We do not heal from what is wrong in order to become amazing, talented, happy creatures. There are all these stories of terrible pain and they are carried by people who are so awe inspiring in their skill, generosity, and general awesomeness. And that kind of makes the world a swirling tragedy, but it also kind of makes it filled to the brim with crazy punch drunk un-suppressible hope.

I am both.

I am guessing you are too.

The world is a miracle that way. (Rebel with a Labelmaker, August 18)

The Rev. Marilyn Sewell acknowledges her struggle with depression, and describes how depression feels.

We go through the day encased in a bubble, untouched by the life moving all around us. Ordinary sadness can be punctured by beauty, grief by hope. But depression disallows the small joys that coax others into wanting to get up another day. We can describe the sunset, but we can’t experience the sunset. We know people care, but no one can reach us. We are outcast, forsaken, a canker sore on the body of the community. We just want the pain to end. (HuffPo Religion, August 18)

Relentless usefulness, radical love

The Rev. Dr. Cynthia Landrum hopes that the UUA will re-envision Donald Skinner’s goal of being “relentlessly useful.”

Create branding, yes, but create the websites, the newsletters, the pamphlets, the print ads, the Facebook photos for us to use it on. Help our churches by doing payroll for us and free us up from the back-office work, much like you help us with our endowments with the Common Endowment Fund. Free up our congregations to do what they do best. (The Lively Tradition, August 16)

Justin Almeida feels called by faith, vocation, and impending fatherhood to learn “radical love.”

My first child will be born around Christmas this year. My partner and I didn’t know if we could conceive. Now a baby is around the corner and the world is suddenly smaller because it is filled with baby-potential. And just like I would hate to have somebody come over with a pile of dirty dishes in the sink and dog hair everywhere, I am ashamed at the state of my world for which responsibility will fall on my child. The only way my son/daughter is going to succeed where my generation has failed is if I can teach them radically hard love, and I can’t teach something I haven’t experienced. (What’s My Age Again?, August 18)

Categories: UU News

UUA President's Statement on Ferguson

UUA Top Stories - Wed, 2014-08-20 01:00
UUA President Rev. Peter Morales has issued a statement following the continued violence in Ferguson, MO. It begins, 'The images from Ferguson, Missouri, are profoundly unsettling: tanks, tear gas, military weaponry for urban warfare, angry crowds. We immediately feel a mixture of shock, anger, dismay, helplessness, sympathy, and outrage. As religious people who are committed to compassion and justice, what are we to do?'
Categories: UU News

Iowa UUs win victories in decriminalizing HIV status

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-18 01:00
NEWS: Unitarian Universalists lead efforts to decriminalize HIV status in Iowa.
Categories: UU News

Suffering on trial

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-18 01:00
IDEAS: Three liberal theologians take on the problem of suffering.
Categories: UU News

Preach the rage, a Confederate Party, and more UU blogging

News from Far Off UU Congregations - Fri, 2014-08-15 15:02
Preach it

It has been a week full of bad news, and the Rev. Dr. Victoria Weinstein exhorts her clergy readers to “preach the front pages” this Sunday.

Preach the news. Preach the fire. Preach the rage, the sadness, the lamentation. Preach it fierce. Bring your rage, your solidarity, your authority to confront: to confront ourselves, to confront our God, to confront yourself, to confront our sick, sick society. Confront what is really happening. (Beauty Tips for Ministers, August 14)

Patrick Murfin says that when the news beats us up, it is “time to step up, not away.”

Hiding from it will not save you. It will make you, however unwittingly, an accomplice.

None of us have the power to stop these things. All of us have the power to move the world, if only a little, along that long promised arc that bends towards justice. We are called to crawl out from under the covers and unleash our love—muscular love—applied with plenty of elbow grease. Not platitudes but action. (Heretic, Rebel, a Thing to Flout, August 15)

Ferguson, and wherever you are

The killing of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and subsequent events drew the attention of many UU bloggers this week.

The Rev. Meg Riley is “struggling to discern how to be part of the solution instead of part of the problem.”

Where do you locate yourself in these stories? Who do you see as dangerous, and who is trustworthy? Where do you locate safety? What would safety look like for the people of Ferguson now, for instance? As a white person in the U.S., I am conditioned from birth to see whiteness as safety—white neighborhoods, white people, white authority figures. My lived experience, my conversations with people of color, and my study of history have shown me over and over that this is a wild and cruel perversion of the truth. (HuffPost Religion, August 14)

The Rev. Jake Morrill says, “it’s not just Ferguson.

As protests in Ferguson, Missouri, go on tonight, a lot of my white brothers and sisters are focused on how, in the short-term, to restore order. But the real question is how, in the long-term, to restore justice. (Quest for Meaning, August 13)

The Rev. David Breeden responds in verse.

The measured response of empire
is death—war against war;
attack against attack; violence
to violence. Murder. Revenge.
Death. The measured response of

empire is insanity. The peace of
empire is reloading the gun. It
is the realm of hungry ghosts,
shiny new helmets in the void. (Theopoetics, August 15)

Christine Slocum is uncomfortable with the way African American spirituals are often sung in UU churches.

How dare white people sing African-American spirituals while our police forces shoot black teenagers.
How dare white people sing African-American spirituals when African-Americans are killed on the presumption of criminality by citizens?
How dare white people sing African-American spirituals when African-American men are sent disproportionately to prison on drug charges, despite similar rates of drug use?
I could go on. My point is that the oppression of African Americans has never ended, and yet white people sing the songs. (This Too Will Pass, August 10)

Kim Hampton asks, “How the hell did y’all get this blind?

Did y’all think that Trayvon Martin was a one off? Did you not see the story about Jordan Davis? Renisha McBride? (East of Midnight, August 14)

The Rev. Theresa Novak laments,

Oh waste of loss
America we’ve failed
Storm clouds gather
Justice must rain down
Tears are not enough. (Sermons, Poetry, and Other Musings, August 14)

Depression and suicide

Anyone who is suicidal may receive immediate help by logging onto Suicide.org or by calling 1-800-SUICIDE. Suicide is preventable, and if you are feeling suicidal, you must get help.

Kimberley Debus responds to the deaths from suicide of the Rev. Jennifer Slade and Robin Williams from personal experience, having “lived that moment, when a decision is made.”

You may not know what to say exactly. But say something. And genuinely listen. (Notes from the Far Fringe, August 13)

Kari Kopnick cautions against the phrase “committed suicide.”

People die by suicide. It is a horrible tragedy. But lets not make it worse by saying that our beloved brother or sister committed something. Language matters, what we say makes a difference and the words we choose change the meaning of what we say. (Chalicespark, August 12)

The Rev. Meg Riley acknowledges that sometimes love is not enough.

As I have witnessed the conversations taking place in the wake of his suicide—about depression, about grief, about being bipolar and about loving people who have depression or are bipolar, what I have realized is this: We are all grappling with the edges of the power of love. We loved him, and yet he committed suicide. Our love—the real love of millions of people—did not save him. If so much love couldn’t save him, where is the hope for the rest of us poor schlubs? (HuffPost Religion, August 13)

The Rev. Tony Lorenzen puzzles about how personally he has taken Williams’s death.

It’s the depression, both his and mine, that makes his passing a powerful loss. . . . Robin Williams evokes this pain about the battle with depression, not because he’s the first or most well known to die from it, but because he was one I grew up with and he played roles that deeply affected me. (Sunflower Chalice, August 12)

Politics and culture

Doug Muder asserts, “Not a Tea Party, a Confederate Party.”

Here’s what my teachers should have told me: “Reconstruction was the second phase of the Civil War. It lasted until 1877, when the Confederates won.” I think that would have gotten my attention.

It wasn’t just that Confederates wanted to continue the war. They did continue it, and they ultimately prevailed. They weren’t crazy, they were just stubborn. (The Weekly Sift, August 11)

The Rev. Tom Schade says, “We should be re-thinking all of our big thoughts about the state of our political order.”

The police killing of Michael Brown, and the police repression of the community that has demanded accountability, should push people like us (who are more unfamiliar and misinformed about the conditions of life of African Americans than we think we are) into an extended campaign of learning, re-thinking, and teaching.

Learning, Re-Thinking, and Teaching are political acts of great significance and power. (The Lively Tradition, August 14)

Categories: UU News

UUs gather nationwide to protest police violence, and other UUs in the media

UU in the news - Fri, 2014-08-15 14:44

Silent vigil held for Ferguson teen killed by police

Unitarian Universalist Church of Ogden, Utah, minister the Rev. Shelley Page and dozens of members from various Ogden-area congregations gathered in downtown Ogden this week to hold a silent vigil for Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager who was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Mo. “(We’re here) to stand in solidarity for people around the nation and the world with those who have fallen to police violence,” said Page. (Standard Examiner - 8.15.14)

Related stories include:

“Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Elkhart holds candlelight vigil for Ferguson” (The Elkhart Truth - 8.15.14)

“Jackson residents take part in vigil for Michael Brown, victims of police brutality in Ferguson, Missouri” (mlive - 8.14.14)

“Vigil planned in McHenry for killed Missouri teen” (Northwest Herald - 8.14.14)

New Jersey congregation helps fund preschool education

The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Somerset Hills, N.J., presented a substantial donation to the Interfaith Hospitality Network of Somerset County to help fund preschool education for children served by the network. Members of the church also serve as volunteers to the network, which provides emergency shelter, transitional housing, and support services to families throughout the county. (nj.com - 8.10.14)

More news from UUs and congregations

The Rev. Marilyn Sewell, minister emerita of First Unitarian Church in Portland, Ore., offers advice on how best to help someone you suspect may be depressed. The first thing? Don’t tell them to count their blessings. (OregonLive.com – 8.12.14)

Members of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Akron, Ohio, focus on three main aspects of social justice ministry to change lives in their community: teen outreach, immigration justice, and food justice. The church was a recent recipient of the Unitarian Universalist Association’s Bennett Award for Human Justice and Social Action. (Akron Beacon Journal – 8.8.14)

An ex-Westboro Baptist Church member has come forward to offer advice to those seeking to dismantle the Kansas-based sect known for spreading anti-gay propaganda and messages of hate. “Create a dialogue of love,” Zach Phelps-Roper said in his own “Ask Me Anything” interview on popular website Reddit. “If you truly want the church to dissolve, that is what you need to do. You need to sincerely show them love.” Phelps-Roper now attends a UU church. (New York Daily News – 8.10.14)

Categories: UU News

Up to Our Necks

UUA Top Stories - Thu, 2014-08-14 01:00
'This is a problem for our whole nation, not just for people of color. We are in this together. And riot gear, intimidation, and more brutality from police are not the way forward towards healing. They are, in fact, yet another giant step backwards,' reflects the Rev. Meg Riley, senior minister of the Church of the Larger Fellowship, on the police brutality in Ferguson, MO in The Huffington Post .
Categories: UU News

A kind of mirror

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-11 01:00
SPIRIT: I never considered myself a visual artist, but then, I never expected to have cancer.
Categories: UU News

31 UUs arrested at immigration protest at White House

UU World - Mon, 2014-08-11 01:00
NEWS: Unitarian Universalists made up largest contingent in interfaith action July 31.
Categories: UU News
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